Project Management

Project Highlights in Chronological Order

This is only a partial list showing the highlights. I have managed projects using both waterfall and agile (and multiple flavors of agile), from teams of 2 to teams of 65+, and from budgets in the thousands to budgets in the tens of millions.

  • Renovation of The Computer Resource Center, Dartmouth College, 1994.

    • This was a 30K renovation of the pre-sales/demo center I managed that I designed including furniture that I had custom built to my specifications by Pompanoosuc Mills
  • Project Llama (Threaded newsreader), Dartmouth College, 1995.
  • NeWWW (Website to showcase interesting websites), Dartmouth College, 1995.
  • Expansion of WebCT’s Customer Service team, WebCT, 1999-2000.
    • ULT acquired WebCT in the spring of 1999 and kept WebCT, dropping ULT. I was asked to take over their customer support team, based in Vancouver. I quickly learned that this ten-person team, largely a skunkworks operation consisting of developers who had slid into a support role, was not at all happy about this move. I flew out to meet with them and found that all guest chairs had been removed so I had no place to sit. So, I sat on the floor when I spoke to people. I asked everyone to tell me about their jobs, what they did, what they liked, what they didn’t like. I then asked them what we in the Boston office could do for them. In short order, I had won them over (it helped that I was the first person from the US who had not shown up in their office wearing a suit). Over the next year and a half I flew out often and worked with them to grow the team to 65 people in three distinct teams, hired a director to manage the entire operation, and improved their response time dramatically and building out a new facility for the team to operate. I did all of this staying within budget and meeting all target milestones. As an added bonus, I had one of the best relationships with the Vancouver team and was sometimes called the Ambassador to Canada in the Boston Office.
  • DisabilityDirect.gov / DisabilityInfo.gov / Disability.gov, Devis 2001-2004.
    • Fully accessible (Section 508 compliant) website that was a first-ever cross-agency endeavor to provide information about services to Americans with disabilities.
    • Site had to be moved to a new data facility and converted from open source tools (Zope, Python) and into JavaEE in 60 days by Executive Memorandum signed by the President. Work was intense but completed on time for a splashy launch at the Reagan Building by the Secretary of Labor.
    • For more on this, see the Innovation & New Technologies page of this portfolio.
  • Milspouse.org (Military Spouse Resource Center for the Department of Defense), Devis 2002-2003.
  • Career OneStop Coach (for the Department of Labor), Devis 2003-2005.
    • Innovative frames-based approach for using one site (in a small frame on the side) to instruct a person on how to use another website (in the main frame) that was also fully accessible.
  • EZRO (EZ Reusable Objects), Devis, 2002-2005.
    • A SCORM-compliant learning management system and content management system that served as the basis for numerous other sites/projects at Devis including earlier versions of Disability*.gov.
  • Many other, smaller projects for various agencies including the FDA, Department of Labor, Department of Defense, and USAID. In addition, I served as the in-house designer and accessibility expert and also produced marketing materials and contributed to bids and proposals. Devis 2001-2005.
  • DocCentral & RSGT Migration, Pfizer 2006.
    • Migration of two systems from data centers that were closing down to new facilities. One required a complete upgrade to an existing system (that was discovered after the project was scoped out) and the other required moving an ancient Sun server on a truck as the system would not run on newer hardware. In order to mitigate risk, I called all around until I found someone in the Ann Arbor facility who had the same hardware and got them to load a full dump of the system so we had a failover if the server happened to break in transit.
  • Numerous smaller projects including rescuing a project that had gone badly under another PM. Pfizer 2005-2006.
  • Program Support Team (PMO at Pfizer), 2006-2009.
    • I was hired as a Project Manager but was asked to join the SAIC team building a PMO within Pfizer. In addition to mentoring new project managers in Pfizer’s specific project lifecycle, I also helped found the Program Health Reporting group and devised a zero-cost Sharepoint system for PMs to report weekly status saving the cost of purchasing a more complicated system. Compliance with weekly reporting improved dramatically within days of it going live.
  • Rosetta Migration (Relocating all computing assets for a bioinformatics team moving from Seattle to Boston), Merck, 2090.
  • Linux Compute Cluster (Building out a high powered Linux computing cluster for bioinformatics research). Merck, 2090.
  • Large File Transfer Program, Merck, 2010.
    • Worked across teams to devise a system for the moving of massively large files into and out of Merck via physical media
  • Microsoft EPM P11 to P12 Upgrade. Pfizer, 2010.
    • The EPM server hosts thousands of projects running in excess of 30 years; we believe it to be on the largest installations in the world. Microsoft wasn’t able to help us with this one. I managed a large team of IT staff across different groups in Pfizer including an external team leading an off-shore development effort to upgrade needed tools used with Microsoft Project and the EPM server. Incidentally, this project had failed two years prior and this was the second attempt. So, risk mitigation was a major priority. The upgrade went off very smoothly and we came in under budget.
  • Ozmott (iOS and Android App), Ozmott 2011-Present
    • I am serving as the Senior Project Manager of a development team (initially 10 people in the run up to 1.0; subsequently down to just 2 during the point upgrades) and have been the lead UX/UI designer of all releases since 1.0.

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